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"Reasonable Zones of Privacy"- The Supreme Court's Struggle to Find Clarity in the American Landscape Regarding Fourth Amendment Rights

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dc.contributor.author Alben, Alex
dc.date.accessioned 2017-07-17T16:24:30Z
dc.date.available 2017-07-17T16:24:30Z
dc.date.issued 2017-07
dc.identifier.citation 12 WASH. J.L. TECH.& ARTS 145 (2017) en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2157-2534
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1773.1/1704
dc.description Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts, Volume 12, Issue 2, Winter 2017 en_US
dc.description.abstract Abstract: The U.S. Supreme Court has struggled over the years to develop the concept of what constitutes a "reasonable zone of privacy" when it comes to intrusion on an individual's physical space or activities. With the advent and widespread adoption of new technologies such as drones and listening devices, concern for protecting privacy has magnified, yet court doctrine remains inconsistent. The author, Washington State's Chief Privacy Officer, reviews the history of Supreme Court "search and seizure" rulings in prominent cases to identify both patterns and flaws on the topic of protecting citizen privacy en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Seattle: Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts, University of Washington School of Law en_US
dc.subject Privacy en_US
dc.title "Reasonable Zones of Privacy"- The Supreme Court's Struggle to Find Clarity in the American Landscape Regarding Fourth Amendment Rights en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.rights.holder Copyright 2017 Alex Alben en_US


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